Tag Archives: Russ Roberts

Health Policy Updates: July 8 2017

One of the arguments from Republicans to support the BCRA’s steep cuts to Medicaid is that it is “bad insurance” – that having Medicaid somehow causes its beneficiaries to have WORSE health outcomes than those without insurance at all. Clearly, this is an extraordinary claim; how could having health insurance make one worse off? Is there “extraordinary evidence” to support the notion that Medicaid is harmful?

Health policy experts Austin Frakt and Aaron Carroll examine the available evidence. Moving beyond purely correlational studies (Medicaid patients are also quite poorer than average Americans, and so have many reasons to be unhealthy besides having Medicaid), it becomes clear that Medicaid does not, in fact, harm people.

“Findings from more recent studies looking at expansions in enrollment, in the 2000s and then under the Affordable Care Act in 2014, are consistent with older ones. One can argue that Medicaid can be improved upon, but the credible evidence to date is that Medicaid improves health. It is better than being uninsured.”
Continue reading Health Policy Updates: July 8 2017

Health Policy Updates: July 31 2016

With the prices of many new specialty pharmaceuticals skyrocketing, the number of patients qualifying for Medicare’s “catastrophic” prescription drug provision is skyrocketing as well.

“Experts say the rapid rise in spending for pricey drugs threatens to make the popular prescription benefit financially unsustainable. Nonpartisan congressional advisers at the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission have called for an overhaul. The presidential candidates, as well as the Obama administration, have proposed giving Medicare legal authority to negotiate prices.”

Continue reading Health Policy Updates: July 31 2016