Tag Archives: gun violence

Health Policy Updates: November 11 2017

The USA has a public health problem with gun violence. This is a pretty hot-button issue, with a lot of differing opinions and differing values. One thing that seems very clear from the data, however, is that the notion that privately-owned guns help prevent gun crime is a myth.

Continue reading Health Policy Updates: November 11 2017

Health Policy Updates: October 15 2017

Vox.com runs down the recent Trump executive order on health care:

“The ultimate impact will depend on any new regulations written as a result of the order, but overall, the Trump administration could make cheaper plans with skimpier benefits more available — and experts worry that will damage the ACA’s marketplaces.”

More on the White House’s efforts to undermine Obamacare in absence of a Congressional repeal bill:

“But Trump administration officials say that with insurance premiums soaring in many states, consumers should be able to buy less comprehensive, less expensive coverage as an alternative to conventional plans…That has some insurance experts worried. The influx of a set of plans exempt from the Affordable Care Act rules will essentially divide the market and make it increasingly unstable, said Rebecca Owen, a health research actuary with the Society of Actuaries.”

The NYTimes is keeping track of all the ways the White House has been sabotaging the health care law.
Continue reading Health Policy Updates: October 15 2017

Health Policy Updates: February 13 2016

This piece isn’t health care policy per se, but it does have a lot to say about the ongoing conversation on high drug prices. This New Yorker story uses the bona-fide villain of the pharmaceutical industry, Martin Shkreli, as a jumping-off point to discuss larger problems with our current system.

“A truly greedy executive would keep a much lower profile than Shkreli: there would be no headline-grabbing exponential price hikes, just boring but reliable ticks upward; no interviews, no tweeting, and absolutely no hip-hop feuds. A truly greedy executive would stay more or less anonymous. (How many other pharmaceutical C.E.O.s can you name?) But Shkreli seems intent on proving a point about money and medicine, and you don’t have to agree with his assessment in order to appreciate the service he has done us all. By showing what is legal, he has helped us to think about what we might want to change, and what we might need to learn to live with.” Continue reading Health Policy Updates: February 13 2016