Tag Archives: 340B

Health Policy Updates: January 7 2018

I loved this perspective piece in JAMA on pricing inefficiencies in US health care. Authors Austin Frakt and Michael Chernew point out several areas in which the US health care system pays different prices for the same care – including 340b drug pricing, and differential Medicare reimbursement between office-based and hospital care – and how these price distortions harm care delivery. Highly recommended, in understanding some of the structural problems in our health care system.

“…Implementing site-neutral payments, and reforming how the physician fee schedule is updated are examples of potentially simple, although admittedly politically difficult, policy changes…Nevertheless, changing fee schedules is difficult because politically powerful stakeholders, such as hospitals, that succeed under the current system (many of whom built business models based on the existing prices) vigorously oppose it. These groups often maintain they need the revenue resulting from overpriced services to accomplish a valued mission.”

Continue reading Health Policy Updates: January 7 2018

Health Policy Updates: October 28 2017

The Alexander-Murray bill, a bipartisan compromise to try to stabilize the Obamacare insurance markets, already faced some big hurdles, such as ambiguous support from the White House. This week, an alternative “stabilization” bill emerged, this one entirely Republican, which seems to look a little bit more like Obamacare repeal than simply an insurance market patch.

“Hatch-Brady adds explicitly partisan objectives that Democrats will likely reject: the cuts to the Obamacare mandates and the introduction of anti-abortion restrictions to the CSR payments…Hatch and Brady have now introduced two of the most divisive issues in health policy — the individual mandate and abortion — to the Obamacare stabilization talks. Their plan is more akin to a slightly skinnier version of ‘skinny repeal’ from the summer than an Obamacare stabilization package that both parties would likely support.”

Continue reading Health Policy Updates: October 28 2017